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We LOVE Our Grandmother’s Crochet

My mom often makes remarks on how thrilled the grandmothers would be with my job. At Soho Publishing, I find myself buried in yarn and patterns day in and day out and loving it. I would have loved sending Myrt hand dyed silk yarn, easing the pain of the acrylic rubbing her dry skin, and Irene would have loved the…

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Tunisian Crochet – No Boundaries

One of the most important advances in Tunisian Crochet is the introduction of the larger hooks. Most TC afficionados recommend using a hook that is 3-5 sizes larger than what the yarn/thread label suggests. The larger hooks create a looser tension, which creates a much more fluid fabric, than what was possible in the past. By using a larger hook,…

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The Unknown History of Italian Irish Crochet Lace

At the bottom of this page you can see three pictures presenting a very simplified explanation of how Venetian needlelace is constructed. Figure 1: The leaf we have to create. It will be drawn on a board reinforced with cloth, or on waxed canvas. Figure 2: The outline will be worked with a strong thread or with several threads together,…

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From Carpets to Jourabs

We include at bottom an example of a commercial version of Pamir jourabs which resembles a traditional Russian sock. The heel is square shaped. The entire sock is made using slip stitch. The sock is shorter and resembles a boot sock, which is good for hiking. These crochet socks are widely available in many local tourist shops and online stores…

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Reclaiming Crochet, and its American History

The lasting legacy of the Progressive Era is still debated by historians, including the legacy of women’s activism during the period. I keep coming back to words by Kim Werker from one of her essays in Crochet Me, her 2007 book regarding why crochet, now: “My pet theory, though, the post-feminist theory of our lovely crafty revolution, is that fiber…

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Finding Crochet’s American History, Part 2

Patterns and Designers Many women were able to find crochet pattern books in the mid- to late 40s (Hiawatha was a frequent pattern book publisher during this time), and some patterns were published in magazines such as Women’s Day, Good Housekeeping, Women’s Home Companion and Better Homes and Gardens throughout the 50s. However, unlike the turn of the century, magazine…

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Ancient Fibers

MG : Fiber and cloth are notoriously fragile in the archaeological record. Unless the environment is exceptionally conducive to its preservation, we don’t see very much left at sites aside from secondary evidence of its presence, such as spindle whorls, loom weights and clay impressions from fiber. In general, what percentage of artifacts world wide are actual fiber relics? Dr.…

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